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Thread: I need help starting reloading

  1. #11
    Junior Shooter noylj's Avatar
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    As usual, instead of telling the newbie the few things they NEED to do, we start telling them all the things we LIKE to do.

    >I recently bought a L-N-L Classic kit to start reloading. My goals are to save money on ammo while still shooting a very accurate ammo and ultimately shoot more. Down the road I would like to make ammo designated for specific guns/jobs.

    What jobs? One load for action pistol and one load for Bullseye competition or are you discussing rifle loads for hunting different species or competitions?


  2. #12
    Junior Shooter noylj's Avatar
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    >I would like to start with 9mm ammo for a glock 17 until I get my bearings and graduate reloading bullets do long range shooting 500-1000 plus start casting my own bullets.

    You want to "graduate" to shooting 9mm bullets at long ranges (500-1000 yards) or what? You load bullets from the beginning. If you are thinking that "bullets" means "cartridges" or "rounds," stop thinking like Hollywood and use the proper term. Most handloaders would never call a complete round a "bullet."
    First, start simple. Your kit has everything you need except for components and dies. Read the instructions, read die instructions, read a reloading manual or two, and read "ABCs of Reloading."

    >So far I like the idea of the single stage press to learn on later on I can move to a progressive.

    For handgun rounds, progressives can generate a lot of rounds in a lot less time, but for bottleneck rounds (rifles), you need to size the case and seat a primer, remove it, measure the length, and trim as required. After that, you can charge it with a bench-mounted powder measure and immediately inspect the powder charge in the case, seat and crimp a bullet and you're done. For me, a progressive for bottlenecks cases doesn't save any time unless you get a press-mounted trimmer like Dillon makes.

    >Most of the stuff seems pretty easy to find on the internet such as Winchester brass is good for most applications, how to pick out what kind of powder to use, the steps on how to load. Right now the hardest thing for me to find information on is what brand of die to use, I've gathered I would like a set of four die and I do not want a rolling crimp?

    For starters, you go to Powder Valley for bullets. Look to Zero jacketed. Otherwise, go to Precision Delta for jacketed bullets. Don't start with plated or lead-jacketed are more accurate usually and easier to load.
    For handguns, get once-fired cases mixed and have fun. You'll never see more accuracy in 9x19 with matching head stamps and you are likely to lose cases, so why pay for virgin cases or matching head stamps?
    You want to buy primers in bricks of 1000 or sleeves of 5000--CCI, Win, Rem, or Fed.
    Powders: you want to look in your loading manuals and see which powders they recommend for the cartridge/bullet. In general, I would look for Power Pistol, Silhouette, True Blue, or BE-86 or 9x19.
    Dies: in general, Lee dies are all you need. I buy the Lee 3-die sets and a Lee TAPER CRIMP DIE and NOT the Lee FCD for handguns. I think that Hornady makes dies with some nice additions that other dies don't have, but Lee is more than good enough.
    I never saw any need for micrometer dies. They don't make the COL any more accurate--they just make returning to a past setting easier (though I am not sure they are totally perfect).

    >Any help anyone can give me on information I'm not thinking of or some information regarding dies would be great. I'm not worried about paying the money for a good set of dies that will last me I just don't want to buy a ton of things just to find out they don't do what I want them to. Also any recipes for a glock 17 would help. Thank you!

    Your Glock fires the exact same rounds as any other 9x19. The chamber should match SAAMI specifications, so there is no specific Glock data--just what loads work best in YOUR Glock.
    PS: you have to work up loads. There are no "recipes" that you can just load blindly and go out and shoot. You start at the start load and work up.



  3. #13
    Junior Shooter
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    Ironically I started reloading on two progressive presses: 550B for 45 and one for 357/38. My third machine was a 450 to do 44 Magnum.

    I bought a Lock N Load to do rifle rounds. Instead, I ended up getting dies for the S&W 500, S&W 460 and 454 Casull. It's a touch slower by a few minutes. But because I can change dies so easily, I found it wasn't that bad. One thing I did do was get two more powder measures so I could calibrate each one to its respective caliber. I empty them once I'm done so there isn't an accident.

    Each set of equipment is kept in a separate drawer, not to mix things up. They do all use Winchester 296. The 460 and 500 use the same large rifle primer and the 454 uses small rifle primer.


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  4. #14
    Junior Shooter
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    Quote Originally Posted by noylj View Post
    >I would like to start with 9mm ammo for a glock 17 until I get my bearings and graduate reloading bullets do long range shooting 500-1000 plus start casting my own bullets.

    You want to "graduate" to shooting 9mm bullets at long ranges (500-1000 yards) or what? You load bullets from the beginning. If you are thinking that "bullets" means "cartridges" or "rounds," stop thinking like Hollywood and use the proper term. Most handloaders would never call a complete round a "bullet."
    First, start simple. Your kit has everything you need except for components and dies. Read the instructions, read die instructions, read a reloading manual or two, and read "ABCs of Reloading."

    >So far I like the idea of the single stage press to learn on later on I can move to a progressive.

    For handgun rounds, progressives can generate a lot of rounds in a lot less time, but for bottleneck rounds (rifles), you need to size the case and seat a primer, remove it, measure the length, and trim as required. After that, you can charge it with a bench-mounted powder measure and immediately inspect the powder charge in the case, seat and crimp a bullet and you're done. For me, a progressive for bottlenecks cases doesn't save any time unless you get a press-mounted trimmer like Dillon makes.

    >Most of the stuff seems pretty easy to find on the internet such as Winchester brass is good for most applications, how to pick out what kind of powder to use, the steps on how to load. Right now the hardest thing for me to find information on is what brand of die to use, I've gathered I would like a set of four die and I do not want a rolling crimp?

    For starters, you go to Powder Valley for bullets. Look to Zero jacketed. Otherwise, go to Precision Delta for jacketed bullets. Don't start with plated or lead-jacketed are more accurate usually and easier to load.
    For handguns, get once-fired cases mixed and have fun. You'll never see more accuracy in 9x19 with matching head stamps and you are likely to lose cases, so why pay for virgin cases or matching head stamps?
    You want to buy primers in bricks of 1000 or sleeves of 5000--CCI, Win, Rem, or Fed.
    Powders: you want to look in your loading manuals and see which powders they recommend for the cartridge/bullet. In general, I would look for Power Pistol, Silhouette, True Blue, or BE-86 or 9x19.
    Dies: in general, Lee dies are all you need. I buy the Lee 3-die sets and a Lee TAPER CRIMP DIE and NOT the Lee FCD for handguns. I think that Hornady makes dies with some nice additions that other dies don't have, but Lee is more than good enough.
    I never saw any need for micrometer dies. They don't make the COL any more accurate--they just make returning to a past setting easier (though I am not sure they are totally perfect).

    >Any help anyone can give me on information I'm not thinking of or some information regarding dies would be great. I'm not worried about paying the money for a good set of dies that will last me I just don't want to buy a ton of things just to find out they don't do what I want them to. Also any recipes for a glock 17 would help. Thank you!

    Your Glock fires the exact same rounds as any other 9x19. The chamber should match SAAMI specifications, so there is no specific Glock data--just what loads work best in YOUR Glock.
    PS: you have to work up loads. There are no "recipes" that you can just load blindly and go out and shoot. You start at the start load and work up.
    So I mostly agree. I hope the OP knows by now that Glocks have a different barrel...that whole silly octagon thing is very interesting. Go ahead and look it up... The glock will have higher pressure with the same rounds. ..

    I also share TPAM's love of the lock n load setup. Unreal how nice the bushings setup can be. I also have the 2 powder tricklers, but I run 4 different separators (can't remember the name of the little piece with the micrometer adjustment on the lock and load tricklers but that's what I'm calling a separator)
    It's nice not having to change over as often. I have 2 triple beam scales and a digital - the triple beams rarely come out anymore, but their is no questioning their accuracy.

    In the end I think the best equipment a new loader can buy is 2 notebooks and a pencil. Staying organized and writing your thoughts and ideas down will teach you far more than having a fancy press. 1 notebook for the loading and prep. 1 notebook for the shooting.

    My 2 bits.

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  5. #15
    Marksman
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    Agree, CD-R is set up great! Both presses and handgun calibers!


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  6. #16
    Junior Shooter
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    May 2017
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    I beg to differ with the guys that say reloading 9mm is a waste of time. The cheapest decent 9mm ammo I've found here In Oklahoma runs $12.99 for 50 rounds. My reloads cost me $4.80 for 50 rounds if I'm buying the casings too. I cast my own 125 GR bullets and coat them with Hi-Tek to prevent leading the barrel. Casting alone cut my cost buy $65. Buy a reloading manual if you don't have one already. I was always looking online for load data and could've saved the hassle a long time ago.

    As far as dies go, I use Lee carbide dies on a Pro 1000 press and I've never had a problem with them. For the price you can't go wrong.

    Now if you really want to save money and train more I'd recommend looking into the ITarget Pro laser training system. I got mine in last week and it's one of the best investments I've made when it comes to training. For $100 I get to train with my firearm inside my house whenever I want. Who wouldn't learn the fundamentals of shooting without spending a fortune on ammo in the process?


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  7. #17
    Marksman
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    I need help starting reloading

    2 comments on lead.
    1) I would not cook lead indoors. You and your family members can get lead poisoning from inhaling the fumes, and when you go to sell the house it could test positive for lead. You don't want either problem.
    2) inhaling gun smoke..similar risk. Some indoor ranges only allow plated bullets. The butt of the bullet where the powder burn pushes the bullet is especially important to be plated. I used to only load lead for my 44. I'm switching over to plated. My club does have fans on the indoor range which I believe is a requirement from OSHA.

    Economics of shooting do vary. We have no lead smelting operations working in the USA thanks to the EPA, getting very aggressive on air quality. I used to buy lead shot for under $18 for 25#. It went up to $48, and back down to 38-40 now. $4.80 is cheap for shells. I do notice with lead, I have more gun cleaning to do.

    I hear you should not shoot lead in a polygon twist barrel as the lead is hard to remove from that type of rifling. Glock has that system... maybe Kahr?


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    Last edited by mjcmichigan; 05-10-2017 at 04:05 AM.

  8. #18
    Junior Shooter
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjcmichigan View Post
    2 comments on lead.
    1) I would not cook lead indoors. You and your family members can get lead poisoning form inhaling the fumes, and when you go to sell the house it could test positive for lead. You don't want either problem.
    2) inhaling gun smoke..similar risk. Some indoor ranges only allow plated bullets. The butt of the bullet where the powder burn pushes the bullet is especially important to be played. I used to only load lead for my 44. I'm switching over to plated. My club does have fans on the indoor range which I believe is a requirement from OSHA.

    Economics of shooting do vary. We have no lead smelting operations working in the USA thanks to the EPA, getting very aggressive on air quality. I used to by lead shot for under $18 for 25#. It went up to $48, and back down to 38-40 now. $4.80 is cheap for shells. I do notice with lead, I have more gun cleaning to do.

    I hear you should not shoot lead in a polygon twist barrel as the lead is hard to remove from that type of rifling. Glock has that system... maybe Kahr?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I agree 100%. I only cast outdoors and with proper PPE to reduce any risks associated with lead. I have a large outdoor range that I go to just a few miles from the house so a good majority of my shooting takes place outside.

    I've heard the same about shooting lead through polygonal rifling. I believe it's Kahr PM series and Springfield XDM series pistols that also it. They do make aftermarket barrels which have traditional rifling for use with lead cast bullets. It might be something to look into if you do a lot of shooting and want to use cheaper ammo while at the range.

    The Hi-Tek coating I use creates a lubricated barrier between the lead and barrel resulting in less friction which in turn reduces the heat of the barrel and extending its overall life. Another benefit is it requires less powder to achieve the normal velocity due to the reduced friction and there's no smoke unlike traditional lead bullets. It's similar to the powder coating process that some casters use except that it is made into a liquid that dries onto the bullet and then it is baked before sizing. A lot of competitive shooters around here swear by the stuff and it's a pretty inexpensive process.


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  9. #19
    Marksman
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    Very Nice! Hi Tek looks like a good option!


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  10. #20
    Junior Shooter
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjcmichigan View Post
    Very Nice! Hi Tek looks like a good option!


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    A little goes a long way. It's definitely worth looking into.


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