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Thread: I need help starting reloading

  1. #1
    Junior Shooter
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    Dec 2016
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    I need help starting reloading

    I recently bought a Hornady Lock-N-Load Classic kit to start reloading. My goals are to save money on ammo while still shooting a very accurate ammo and ultimately shoot more. Down the road I would like to make ammo designated for specific guns/jobs. I would like to start with 9mm ammo for a glock 17 until I get my bearings and graduate reloading bullets do long range shooting 500-1000 plus start casting my own bullets. So far I like the idea of the single stage press to learn on later on I can move to a progressive. Most of the stuff seems pretty easy to find on the internet such as Winchester brass is good for most applications, how to pick out what kind of powder to use, the steps on how to load. Right now the hardest thing for me to find information on is what brand of die to use, I've gathered I would like a set of four die and I do not want a rolling crimp?. Any help anyone can give me on information I'm not thinking of or some information regarding dies would be great. I'm not worried about paying the money for a good set of dies that will last me I just don't want to buy a ton of things just to find out they don't do what I want them to. Also any recipes for a glock 17 would help. Thank you!


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    Last edited by tdkeesey; 12-16-2016 at 06:39 AM.

  2. #2
    Marksman
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    Jan 2017
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    I don't load 9mm. There's so much affordable 9mm, that for plinking buy is the way to go. Big bore and rifle is were you'll save $$.

    Starting with the single stage is great.


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  3. #3
    Administrator 1911's Avatar
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    I agree with mjcmichigan on the 9mm thing, I used to do it, but dont anymore.
    I found its way cheaper and less time consuming to shoot factory. Tula is quite reasonable and shoots great.

    If your new to reloading, want to load 500-1000yd range, non competition rifle, look at single stage or Lee classic turret.
    Having all your dies set in a turret, all set and ready to go at any time, is a nice feature.
    Lee dies are a great start as well and affordable. Their collet neck die, is outstanding and you wont find a better non bushing neck die.

    www.seattleguns.net

    Careful man, there's a beverage here!

  4. #4
    Junior Shooter
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    Feb 2017
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    I have been reloading 9mm for a little over a year now. Using collected range brass, Winchester small pistol primers, 5.0 gr CFE Pistol powder and Berry's 124 gr THP. Cost is about .15 per round vs. the .25 per round for factory plinking rounds. I have the Hornady classic press and use the Hornady Custom 3 Die Set. I have shot these rounds out of Glock 26, 34, and 17L with no issues, and they produce tight groups.

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  5. #5
    Marksman
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    Jan 2017
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    For reference, I'm loading 44 specials, 44 mags, and 45 acp in the range of 22-24 cents per round. Factory 44s are 75/round, and 45's range from 36-52/round. I have the Lee carbide 4 die set for the 44's. I like them. Also got the volume metered attachment. Works fine for plinking and casual target. Drops powder for me at plus or minus 0.15 grains. Big time saver! I especially like the collet crimper from Lee. Most my rifle stuff I use RCBS (Best customer service) or Redding Competition dies. Branch out to rifles. 22-250 and 308win is a dream to load. When your good at that...expand to Belted Mags.


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  6. #6
    Junior Shooter
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    Feb 2017
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    I 2nd the hornady custom dies. They're hard to beat - truly in the handgun world most of these things are quite forgiving. The lock n load is the best single stage on the market. Those bushings make life easier.
    Easy... I have multiple rock chuckers... I understand the nostalgia.

    When you get to long range you'll be learning a whole lot about barrels, and chambers, and the lands and the groove, and the bore, and bushing dies, and concentricity, and when you really reach out to the long distances... renkin cycles/ heat cycles.. barrel work and harmonics, barrel lapping..

    Keep it simple for now. Separate your like kinded brass. Check quality after every step. Keep a reloading log...not just for load data, but for ideas, tips, and why you have that one ziploc bag of random brass you stored 3 months ago.
    This will save your bacon many times over.
    Also have a shooting log. Do not combine the 2.

    -GIN

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  7. #7
    Junior Shooter
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    Dec 2016
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    Thank you all for the help/advice.


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  8. #8
    Junior Shooter noylj's Avatar
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    If I shoot it, I reload it. Have no idea where you can find factory 9x19 for the same price as reloaded (though the latest prices for primers and bullets could show otherwise).
    Read several reloading manuals. Read the manual for the press and die instructions. Practice creating inert dummy rounds. Review the manuals' load data and get powder included in all of them. Start loading at the lightest start load. Work up in 0.2-0.3gn increments. Beware of any powder that has a 0.5gn range from start to MAX. Save those for later after you have some experience.
    1) All you need to do is wipe off the exterior of the case before sizing. Don't get all involved in case cleaning--take your time.
    2) Every bullet/gun combination will do best with a slightly different COL. You can use the COL in a manual, but that is only a VERY rough guide.
    Your COL is determined by your barrel (chamber, throat dimensions, and feed ramp) and your magazine (COL that fits magazine and when the magazine lips release the round for feeding) and the PARTICULAR bullet you are using. What worked in a pressure barrel or the lab's gun or in my gun has very little to do with what will work best in your gun.
    Take the barrel out of the gun. Create two inert dummy rounds (no powder or primer) at max COL and remove enough case mouth flare for rounds to chamber (you can achieve this by using a sized case—expand-and-flare it, and remove the flare just until the case "plunks" in the barrel).
    Drop the inert rounds in and decrease the COL until they chamber completely. This will be your "max" effective COL. I prefer to have the case head flush with the barrel hood. After this, place the inert rounds in the magazine and be sure they fit the magazine and feed and chamber.
    You can also do this for any chambering problems you have. Remove the barrel and drop rounds in until you find one that won't chamber. Take that round and "paint" the bullet and case black with Magic Marker or other marker. Drop round in barrel (or gage) and rotate it back-and-forth.
    Remove and inspect the round:
    a) scratches on bullet--COL is too long
    b) scratches on edge of the case mouth--insufficient crimp
    c) scratches just below the case mouth--too much crimp, you're crushing the case
    d) scratches on case at base of bullet--bullet seated crooked due to insufficient case expansion (not case mouth flare) or improper seating stem fit
    e) scratches on case just above extractor groove--case bulge not removed during sizing. May need a bulge buster.
    3) The taper crimp in cartridges that head space on the case mouth (almost all semi-auto handgun cartridges) is to remove the case mouth flare so the cartridge drops into the chamber easily. It is NOT to hold the bullet.
    Also, such case do NOT need trimming and accuracy is hurt by increasing head space it you do trim them.
    4) Start loading with JACKETED bullet at first and graduation to lead or plated.
    5) Start at the basics and don't try to solve problems that you may not even have. Learn the process before you try to improve it.

    Last edited by noylj; 02-20-2017 at 08:18 PM.

  9. #9
    Junior Shooter
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    Jan 2017
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    I am new to hand-loading so not an expert. I load for 6.5 CM using forester dies. More than happy with them so far. My shooting/loading buddy just got a set of Redding comp dies which I have used and they work well. However, I think that the micrometer neck sizing die maybe a bit overkill for recreation shooter.... not to mention the $350 price tag.


  10. #10
    Marksman
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    Jan 2017
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    20

    I need help starting reloading

    The micrometer dies come at lower prices in a number of brands. I normally go with the Redding hunting dies. I can get groups that range from 1.0 to 0.325" with 3006, 223, 243, and 22-250. I like the micrometer as when you are adjusting seating depth, It's real easy to see.

    I have friends using Forester dies...they are more than happy!

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    Last edited by mjcmichigan; 03-31-2017 at 05:50 PM.

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