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Thread: Which powder for 9mm - cast

  1. #11
    Junior Shooter
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    [QUOTE=ROBS1911;1604]So I was looking in my Hornady manual for 380 data. They suggest W231 as the best for 90 to 100 grain 380s. I have been using Power Pistol with good results. Any thoughts out there?
    On another subject, I pick up some Berrys hollow base bullets, 100 grain. Have never used hollow base bullets before.Any advantage? Over solid base bullets?[/QUOTE trying to edit. Not working well, using Kindle Fire

    Quote Originally Posted by ROBS1911 View Post
    ThAt would be Berths bullets



  2. #12
    Administrator 1911's Avatar
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    I havent ever played around loading any .380, so cant help much there.

    I did have several boxes of Berry's hollow base 9mm and .45 bullets, loaded them like cast bullets and they all shot very well, so not sure if either has any advantage over the other as far as solid base vs hollow base.

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  3. #13
    Junior Shooter noylj's Avatar
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    Do you want accuracy? That usually means Power Pistol, Silhouette, True Blue, etc.
    Do you want to simply plink? That usually means you want inexpensive, so you would use a fast powder like AA2, Bullseye, Red Dot, etc.
    I did not find 231/HP38 very good, in terms of accuracy, for .380 or 9x19--but it rocks with .45 Auto.


  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by noylj View Post
    Do you want accuracy? That usually means Power Pistol, Silhouette, True Blue, etc.
    Do you want to simply plink? That usually means you want inexpensive, so you would use a fast powder like AA2, Bullseye, Red Dot, etc.
    I did not find 231/HP38 very good, in terms of accuracy, for .380 or 9x19--but it rocks with .45 Auto.
    Yes it does!
    My favorite 45 auto powder

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    Careful man, there's a beverage here!

  5. #15
    Junior Shooter
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    Right now I use Power Pistol for my 9s and 380s. Works well..

    Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk


  6. #16
    Junior Shooter noylj's Avatar
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    Umm, powder, except in some cases like TiteGroup, is NOT what causes or eliminates leading. The SIZE of the bullet and quality of the lube is what counts.
    0.356" is the MINIMUM size for a near-perfect 0.355" groove barrel. Most 9x19s do MUCH better with 0.357-0.358" lead bullets.
    Slug your barrel.
    Next, if you get leading with commercial bullets;
    1) Don't order the HARD alloy, order the 10-15 BHN alloy (those hard alloys usually need to be at least 0.002" over actual barrel groove diameter, compared to 0.001" for the softer alloy)
    and
    2) Take the bullets and apply a very light tumble coating of Lee Liquid Alox and you will eliminate all or most leading from the too small bullets.

    Last edited by noylj; 03-03-2017 at 04:05 AM.

  7. #17
    Junior Shooter noylj's Avatar
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    Hollow base bullets are generally designed to give a slightly longer bearing surface and the cavity lets the low pressure expand the bullet at the base to seal the bore. Some bullets have such shallow "dished" bases, though, that it hardly looks to be of any benefit. Like to see some fired in a revolver with the barrel removed to see if there is base expansion when fired.
    Of course, some folks are buying CAST and coated bullets that don't have the lube grooves any more, which I can only see as an aesthetic decision. If you look at the bullets from Precision Bullets, you'll see REAL swaged bullets (so no lube grooves) that the others are copying. I would have expected if accuracy was important, the slightly longer bearing distance of the bullets with lube grooves could improve accuracy very slightly, but I can't see any benefit to a CAST bullet without the lube grooves other than they fall out of the mold a lot easier. So, if I was casting and coating, I would want the non-lube groove molds just for ease of casting, with no expectation of any other benefit.


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