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Thread: Whats your favorite load manual?

  1. #1
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    Whats your favorite load manual?

    It's always good to have a variety, but I really like the Richard Lee manual. I noticed almost, all the others max loads, are near or below the Lee book starting loads.
    I know they do this to cover their asses, but they could at least be a little closer to the actual realistic loads.

    Even the Hogdon data, which makes the actual powder, is almost spot on with the Lee book.

    Didnt mean this to sound more like a rant, but was just curious what you all like.
    Most of the stuff I shoot and load for these days, isn't even in, most of the current books...

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  2. #2
    Marksman
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    Funny you mention that. I grabbed the Lee book just to have a look, as it wasn't specific toward a single powder or bullet manufacturer. I like the book and pretty much trust Richard's assessment of the load data. He's done quite a bit of testing over the decades. He also constantly preaches working with lower (read: safer - he covers pressure quite extensively) starting loads. So if he lists max loads that are above other manufacturers, I don't have an issue trusting his data. Other than the occasional but repetitive spelling errors (c'mon Richard, its SAAMI, not SAMMI) and that he likes to toot his horn occasionally it's a solid book.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Beauregard View Post
    Funny you mention that. I grabbed the Lee book just to have a look, as it wasn't specific toward a single powder or bullet manufacturer. I like the book and pretty much trust Richard's assessment of the load data. He's done quite a bit of testing over the decades. He also constantly preaches working with lower (read: safer - he covers pressure quite extensively) starting loads. So if he lists max loads that are above other manufacturers, I don't have an issue trusting his data. Other than the occasional but repetitive spelling errors (c'mon Richard, its SAAMI, not SAMMI) and that he likes to toot his horn occasionally it's a solid book.
    I can't wait til the next edition comes out, it will have more powders and more calibers available. When using the Lee data, I have always started directly with the middle load, never have had any pressure signs, and often it's a nice accurate load too.

    He can "toot" his horn a bit, but he has earned the right, so I dont mind...lol
    He loves his collet neck die! It is an excellent economy neck die, I have used it and it makes some outstanding ammo. It is every bit capable, producing concentric necks with low run out, just like the bushing neck dies. The only issue is trying to get even foot lbs of pressure on the ram, when sizing the necks, to get even neck tension. This is where the bushing dies come into play, no matter the ram pressure, the neck tension will always be consistent......Considering you did your part and cleaned up the outside of the necks first...

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  4. #4
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    Looking forward to the next edition too. Any idea when it will hit the shelf?

    Sure, Richard definitely has room to talk. He's been there.

    Now it's on to find a book that deals with the nitty gritty precision details. Kind of like an advanced skills and techniques guide.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Beauregard View Post
    Looking forward to the next edition too. Any idea when it will hit the shelf?

    Sure, Richard definitely has room to talk. He's been there.

    Now it's on to find a book that deals with the nitty gritty precision details. Kind of like an advanced skills and techniques guide.
    No idea on the next edition, but hopefully not too far off.

    If you want a good book/manual on advanced skills, get the Berger reloading manual. Not only does it have helpful reloading techniques, but it really gets into detail and the science of bullets, there design, bc's, seat depths and etc interesting stuff.

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  6. #6
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    Hmm, that piques my interest. Just looked it up on Midway. Looks like it has a ton of technical material.

    To boot I have a couple hundy Berger bullets waiting to be put to good use. I'll definitely check that one out.

    Ever looked at the Norma?


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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Beauregard View Post
    Hmm, that piques my interest. Just looked it up on Midway. Looks like it has a ton of technical material.

    To boot I have a couple hundy Berger bullets waiting to be put to good use. I'll definitely check that one out.

    Ever looked at the Norma?
    I havent checked out the norma manual, bit when I am down at Cabela's, I will some times browse through the manuals. Some are sealed, but every now and then, one will be out of the wrapper.

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