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Thread: lapua brass prep.

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Rod View Post
    Got my primer pocket uniformer and did up 100 rounds. Very much suprised at the variance in the pockets. They looked really good out of the box but when hit with the cutter you see the manufacturing tolerances. Some were humped in the middle, alot were crooked. Alot of work. Now they are all perfect! Still need the flash hole tool.
    It is a lot of work and not always that fun..lol
    I usually go and do a few in the evening during commercials on tv, before you know it, you got a 100 done in no time.

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  2. #12
    Sharp Shooter J-Rod's Avatar
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    Flash hole tool is on the way. Got the Lyman model. Getting closer!


  3. #13
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    I picked up a bag of Winchester brass awhile back from Cabela's, what a dissapointment, while uniforming and deburring flash holes, about 1 out every ten had an oblong (oval shaped) primer flash hole. Not gonna be able to fix that. I also found one with a split in the shoulder. That was the day I decided that I am only going to buy Lapua or Lake City .308 brass from now on. They all need some prep, and I have several different brands of brass on hand, but nothing as low quality as that winchester brass I bought!

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  4. #14
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    If you're going to buy lapua brass honestly work up a load and shoot it after 3-4 firing then do all the brass work to an see if yo use a differance. I'm currious to see what the differance is. Are you neck turning the brass or annealing it after every shot? Also the largest reason I've seen for "brass" failure is loose primer pockets. I wouldn't remove material from a pocket.

    Last edited by steveptr; 06-09-2014 at 08:58 PM.

  5. #15
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    Also the largest reason I've seen for "brass" failure is loose primer pockets. I wouldn't remove material from a pocket.
    Uniforming doesnt "loosen" the pocket, it only makes the primer seat more uniform into the pocket, as it doesnt take any material off the sides of the pocket, only uniforms the bottom of the cup to provide flush seating. The flush seating with uniformed flash holes, will provide a more consistent ignition and burn rate. May not be noticeable inside 300yds, but may be noticeable beyond that, so worth the effort if shooting beyond 300yds on a regular basis or shooting competitively. Swaging is the only way to make the pocket loose, if not done properly, this can widen the pocket and cause loose seating.

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  6. #16
    Sharp Shooter J-Rod's Avatar
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    I'm just learning rifle stuff right now. I bought the Lapua brass to give me a good starting point. I could have bought any brand name but Lapua stuff is well liked. My other option was Lake City brass but the prep and mixed lots made me go a different route. I have no delusions of being a match shooter. I'm a fairly average shooter at best. I am enjoying learning precision reloading though. Some day I will get into the finer more extreme aspects in reloading for precision. Honestly most of that will be lost on me and my shooting. Annealing is definately something I'll have to do sooner or later but this 200 rounds will last me awhile. Any input is definately appreciated, Thanks. Jason


  7. #17
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    +1 on annealing for brass life, especially on semi-autos where the shoulder is being worked harder than a bolt gun. It's a great way to protect both your investment in the quality brass and your time making those pieces perfect.


  8. #18
    Sharp Shooter J-Rod's Avatar
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    This is for my Remmy 700. Not sure how may resizes before annealing?


  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Rod View Post
    This is for my Remmy 700. Not sure how may resizes before annealing?
    Generally if a high pressure round, 3-5 loadings between annealings and if a lower pressure round like the 308 5-7 rds. 308 rarely splits necks, I would probably forgo annealing, especially Lapua brass. Lot of guys get 30 shots out of it.

    F-class and comp guys may disagree. I know many of them anneal after every firing.

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